?

Log in

No account? Create an account
February 7th, 2008 - Weather, Or Not — LiveJournal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
rejectomorph

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

February 7th, 2008

Yanked! [Feb. 7th, 2008|10:58 pm]
rejectomorph
The remarkable life of Jane Gallatin Powers. The things one finds on the Internets! And the things one fails to find on the Internets! Try as I might, I can't find any of her paintings displayed online other than two small scans on this page (the text on which is a damaged rehash of that at the earlier link). Her eponymous (second time in two days I've had occasion to use that word) website to which the article links appears to be dead. Alas.


Before getting lost on the Internets, I went to have my head yanked, and I don't know what got loosened up as a result, but things have been tasting and smelling stronger since, and my salivation has increased. That's a result I've never had before. Strange.

Then there was a splendid sunset, the red and pink and orange hues of the clouds reflecting from the remaining snow (still quite a bit, though I expect a substantial reduction tomorrow.)


YouTube is working again, and I resume the interrupted series of embeddings with a recording (year unknown) by Dame Nellie Melba of the highly recognizable "Sempre libera" from Verdi's Traviata. Melba is noted for having had a long-running feud with Tetrazzini, the Diva of my previous post. A couple of Divas, huh? I don't know what the feud was about, but tempting though it is to speculate, I don't think it was over the fact that while Tetrazzini had a chicken dish named for her, the comparatively svelte Melba was the namesake of not only the famous thin and crumbly toast, but of both a peach-based desert and a sauce. Gourmand Tetrazzini must have been envious (over the desert and the sauce, at least). Today, Melba's likeness appears on the hundred dollar bill of her native Australia. How's that for a Diva-tastic triumph?



As pleasant as the Verdi is, there's another YouTube recording of Melba I prefer: what sounds like a very early (and a bit wobbly) record of Debussy's 1883 work "Romance" and early song "Mandoline", a very modern-sounding setting for a poem written by Paul Verlaine. Embedding of this non-video video is disabled, so here's a direct link to the page.
link2 comments|post comment

navigation
[ viewing | February 7th, 2008 ]
[ go | Previous Day|Next Day ]