May 5th, 2006

hindenburg

Soft Threat

The entire front lawn is covered in a thick layer of fallen mulberry blossoms. It looks like a sea of dead green caterpillars. They will have to be raked. I just know that they are still full of pollen that didn't get blown away by the wind. Raking will stir it up. I'll be covered in it. It will almost certainly kill me. I disapprove.

What am I doing up at this hour? Stupid. Should have been asleep ages ago. Feh.
caillebotte_the balcony

Stuff and Nonsense

I finally saw Colbert's bit at the correspondent's dinner. One thing that struck me was how little positive reaction it got from the members of the press in the audience. Tough crowd, dense (intellectually) crowd, or embarrassed-by-their-own-complicity crowd? Hard to say. A bit of each, maybe, but I suspect mostly the latter two.

That said, I have to confess that I found it only intermittently funny myself, but that's partly because I saw Colbert miss what I thought were some obvious opportunities to be better. For example, I found the bit about re-arranging the deck chairs on the Hindenburg was both carelessly thrown away and a bit too blunt. It was a clever idea, but the execution was clumsy, and it pulled Colbert too far out of his comic pro-Bush persona. I'd have liked to hear something more subtle, and yet more savage-- perhaps something such as this (but with greater polish than I have time to give it, of course):
This administration is not sinking, and it is not re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. If anything, it is re-arranging the flowers in the lounge of a Zeppelin. This administration is soaring, but not with unseemly haste. This is no hurried flight of some crowded, plebeian airliner, but the leisurely, graceful and dignified flight of a great, luxurious airship which has left Old Europe far behind and, having crossed our Atlantic shore, has lately soared above the topless towers of Manhattan, and now, soaring southward toward its home, draws near its destination among the fertile American fields.

There, it will be greeted by dignitaries with all the pomp it deserves. The members of the House Judiciary Committee will be there, and the Senate will be well represented, and certainly the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Oh, what a grand spectacle it will be, as the great, gleaming silver airship of the administration approaches the mooring mast, and the Chief Justice invokes the blessings of the Almighty with a prayer, and, oh, all humanity acknowledges that this administration has been gifted with the true spark of genius. The arrival of this administration at its inevitable destination will be no commonplace event, for it has proved itself worthy of no lesser culmination to its efforts.
I'm not sure that many of the press would be knowledgeable enough to get all the points, but most of them would get the gist of it. But this was one of several missed opportunities in the speech. Even improved, the reception probably wouldn't have been much better, though, considering the two elements that made up the audience. Politicians and pundits. I'm glad I didn't have to talk to that lot.

Anyway.

Via scottobear, more detailed news bout the recent problems which knocked LJ out of commission for a few hours the other day. Jason Levine reveals that it may have been largely the fault of an Internet security outfit called Blue Security. If what Levine says proves to be true and 6A doesn't terminate, or at least suspend, Blue Security's Type Pad account, then I'd have to say that our step-mom needs to grow a pair.

There was weather today. I don't have time to write about it. Read an old entry. They're all pretty much the same.