rejectomorph (flying_blind) wrote,
rejectomorph
flying_blind

Annular Eclipse of the Sun.

Late spring is a time of cool nights when the Milky Way can be seen across the sky like a fine dusting of icy blue crystals. It is especially noticeable tonight, when the new moon is on the other side of the world. This evening, (June 10th, here, and June 11th across the date line,) will be the annular eclipse. The path of the eclipse will be primarily across the Pacific Ocean, and the only bit of land from which it will be visible at its maximum will be a small patch of western Mexico around Cabo Corrientes.

But partial coverage will be visible from many parts of the United States. 80% percent coverage of the sun will be seen in San Diego, and almost as much in Los Angeles. Here in Butte County, we will see about 65% coverage. Since maximum coverage will be at about 6:15 PM local time, the sun should still be high enough that I'll get a decent view, before it descends behind the trees. I have been told that the foliage of trees acts very much like a pinhole projector (a hole in a piece of cardboard, through which the sun's light is projected onto a surface for safe viewing.) With all the trees around here, there is a chance that, for a while, the streets will be covered with little crescents of light. If it happens, I'll try to get a picture of it- although, given the crappiness of my camera, I can't promise anything. This will be the closest to complete coverage of the sun that I have ever seen in an eclipse. There is a very good chance that it won't cloud up here this evening! Now, I only need to remember to go out and look. Remind me to remind myself.
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